Time for Tom Corbett to get HIS!!


HARRISBURG—

— With former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky behind bars, convicted on 45 of 48 counts of child sexual abuse, it might have been the question that Gov. Tom Corbett thought had finally gone away.
But with the release Thursday of former FBI Director Louis Freeh‘s report on the handling of the scandal that rocked the university to its core, Corbett was asked it again: As the attorney general who began the investigation into the allegations against Sandusky, what would you have done differently? Would you have moved more quickly to get Sandusky off the streets?
The Republican‘s anger was instant and incandescent.

“Why are you all obsessed with that?” he retorted, his face growing red at the query from a Philadelphia Inquirer reporter. “It has been answered. It has been answered over and over and over again.”
Corbett rapped his podium, underscoring each “over” with the quick smack of his fist.
“Forty-five of 48 counts,” he fumed. “We do not hold up investigations for anything. You are disparaging the reputation of the men and women in that office who have worked very hard to get to the result that justice was served and a monster was taken off the street.”
That Sandusky walked free for nearly three years while investigators built their case against him has been the question nagging at Corbett since the grand jury report was released in November. Corbett served as attorney general from 2004 to 2010.

The Penn State child sex abuse investigation has already cost the university more than $12 million


excerpted from ABC News Lyneka Little

 

The university launched an Openness Website that follows the amount spent on legal fees and crisis communication. The financial figures, which were last updated in Feb. 2012, show more money being spent on the internal investigation and crisis management than on legal services and defense.

According to the Websites Openness page, by the end of Feb. the University spent more than $5.3 million on its internal investigation and crisis communication in the sex abuse scandal that rocked the University last year.

Two months later the figure would balloon even more.

According to the Centre Daily Times, by the end of April the University had shelled out close to $12 million in legal and other fees in connection to the child abuse scandal related to the case. Of the $11.9 million spent, more than half was spent on crisis management and for an internal investigation.

The university has spent $2.46 million for the board of trustees’ internal investigation, including $1.14 million to Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan, former FBI director Louis Freeh‘s firm, according to Pennstatetrustee.com, a blog operated by Myke Triebold, a Penn State graduate. The website breaks down the fees with $111,164 going to Domus Inc. and $172,563 to Kekst and Company Inc., both for public relations for Freeh; $499,370 to Ketchum Public Relations for crisis management; $506,162 to Reed Smith LLP and $32,053 for “other” consultants and costs. (as of February)

With the college’s reputation at stake, Roskopf does not find the figure spent for crisis management surprising.