Emails Conflict Testimony of Spanier, Curley, Schultz


Before the grand jury investigating child sexual  abuse by former Penn State coach Jerry  Sandusky, Spanier had denied that he had discussed with former Athletic  Director Tim  Curley and retired Vice President Gary  Schultz turning a 2001 allegation over to authorities.

Email shows otherwise. Confronted in 2001 with the question of how to  respond to another coach’s report of seeing Sandusky naked in a shower with his  arms around a boy’s middle, Spanier had agreed with Curley that the best course  of action was to skirt authorities and confront Sandusky directly.
“The approach you outline is humane and a reasonable way to proceed,” Spanier  wrote, according to the email presented as evidence during the preliminary  hearing on charges the men lied and hid Sandusky’s crimes.

Prosecutors detailed allegations that the men agreed not to report a 2001  allegation Sandusky sexually assaulted a boy in a shower even though they knew  he had previously been investigated for similar conduct.

Their “conspiracy of silence” allowed Sandusky to abuse at least three more  children on campus between 2001 and 2009, Beemer said in his closing  argument.

“By their own admission they had thousands of children on their campus for  all types of camps and activities and they take the position in 2001 to allow  Jerry Sandusky to have access to the campus,” Beemer said.

Beemer said evidence, including correspondence beyond emails, contradicts the  men’s grand jury testimony that they had limited knowledge of the 2001  allegation and a 1998 criminal investigation of Sandusky, and shows they worked  to deceive even as investigators closed in.

Curley and Schultz Ask For Dismissal


In new briefs filed in Dauphin County court Friday, attorneys for two former Penn State administrators pressed for a hearing on their claims that Athletic Director-on-leave Tim Curley and retired senior vice president Gary Schultz were effectively denied legal counsel when they testified in 2011 before a grand jury investigating the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.

The defendants’ have maintained they thought then-University Counsel Cynthia Baldwin was representing them.

Baldwin, however, has argued she represented the administrators only as agents of the university, and has become a likely star witness for the prosecution in its case that Curley and Schultz lied to the grand jury about what they knew of allegations against Sandusky and how they responded to them.

Curley and Schultz’s attorneys have asked for a full hearing before Judge Todd Hoover at which they can present expert testimony about the conflict.

If Hoover finds there was a conflict, the defense has argued, he should at minimum bar prosecutors from using Curley and Schultz’s grand jury testimony at trial, thereby effectively gutting the case against them.

Today’s brief addresses only the original perjury charges filed against Curley and Schultz.

Similar challenges are being waged against perjury counts filed against former Penn State president Graham Spanier, which have not reached the preliminary hearing stage yet.

Penn State Wants McQueary Trial to be on Hold


By Anne Danahy — adanahy@centredaily.com

 Penn State is asking the court to put on hold the lawsuit former coach Mike McQueary filed against the university while the criminal trial of two former administrators is under way.

In a motion filed Monday, Penn State argues that the university “would be severely prejudiced” if the suit were allowed to move forward while the criminal proceedings against former athletic director Tim Curley and retired senior vice president Gary Schultz are still going on. Penn State’s motion notes that the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas has put several civil suits against Penn State on hold for that reason.

Curley and Schultz are facing charges of perjury for testimony they gave to the grand jury investigating Jerry Sandusky and failure to report child abuse. They are scheduled to stand trial in January in Dauphin County Court

How The Current Board of Trustees Spends Your Money


Penn State is paying for two athletic directors at a cost that could exceed $750,000 this year, records suggest.
Curley’s defense attorney Caroline M. Roberto and Schultz’s defense attorney Tom Farrell, both of Pittsburgh, are among about a dozen lawyers, law firms and consultants who collected nearly $3.2 million from Penn State as of Dec. 31 for costs stemming from the Sandusky scandal.  Roberto collected $82,697, and Farrell was paid $65,842, Penn State told the Trib.

In addition to Roberto and Farrell, Vaira & Riley, a Philadelphia law firm, was paid $61,769 for “employee legal defense.”

The university has spent $2.46 million for the board of trustees’ internal investigation, including $1.14 million to Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan, former FBI director Louis Freeh‘s firm; $111,164 to Domus Inc. and $172,563 to Kekst and Company Inc., both for public relations for Freeh; $499,370 to Ketchum Public Relations for crisis management; $506,162 to Reed Smith LLP and $32,053 for “other” consultants and costs.

Penn State disclosed “university legal defense” costs of $359,753, including $172,658 to Saul Ewing LLC; $65,771 to Duane Morris LLC; $26,354 to Lanny J. Davis & Associates; and $94,952 for “other.”

A $50,130 bill for costs related to external investigations included $46,173 to Margolis & Healy, a security firm specializing in higher education; $3,711 to the Lightfoot, Franklin & White LLC law firm and $245 listed for “other.”

The school paid $108,205 for contract negotiations, including $88,205 to Schnader, Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP and $20,000 to ML Strategies.

Read more: Athletic directors may cost PSU $750,000 – Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/s_781687.html#ixzz1mYmTeY7l

Penn State Football Severance Payouts Announced


Acting Athletic Director David Joyner said Friday the status of the assistant coaches who aren’t coming back from former coach Joe Paterno‘s staff hasn’t been finalized. Some may choose to retire, others could seek different jobs at Penn State or move on.
Joyner spoke after Penn State’s board of trustees met Friday. He told trustees the severance payout will contribute to a projected net budget loss of $5 million for the upcoming year.
Joyner said the severance figure does not include Paterno, who was ousted in November in the aftermath of child sex abuse charges against retired defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky.
AP story.